Dwarf form

 

Epimedium alpinum 'Shrimp Girl'

E. alpinum  ‘Shrimp Girl’  (Cc. 930006)

The clone ‘Shrimp Girl’ is shorter in height (6-8”) than E. alpinum with shorter rhizomes; spreading only 4-5” a year, but its dense growth habit and thick foliage make it far supe­rior at crowding out weeds. Tiny blooms appear below the leaves and are not usually noticeable unless the plant is elevated on a hillside. A short, neat, ground covering Epimedium with a "cool" name. Semi-evergreen.  $8

Epimedium davidii 'Wolong Dwarfs'

E. davidii   “Wolong Dwarfs” (Sev. clones/Cc. numbers)  


On his first trip to China in 1996, Darrell found two colonies of E. davidii growing on dripping wet cliffs. The few samples he collected turned out to be quite dwarf in size, so he returned again in 2000 to explore further. Climbing higher, he found much larger colonies, where all of the plants were very small. From clumps of tiny evergreen leaflets grow 6-10” flower stems carrying large yellow flowers. Perfect for a very spe­cial spot in the garden or in a trough. Not available in 2017.

Epimedium diphyllum 'Nanum'

E. diphyllum  ‘Nanum’  (Cc. 950054)

A sparkling gem at only 2-4" tall at first bloom, and covered in white bell-shaped flowers. Ultimately reaches 8" high. Ideal for shady rock gardens, path edges or troughs.   $12

Epimedium epsteinii

E. epsteinii   (Several clones/Cc. numbers)   


Discovered in 1994 and named after an outstanding plantsman—the late Harold Epstein. For half a century he grew Epimediums to perfection in his garden “La Rocaille” in Larchmont, NY.

This species has the widest sepals in the genus, nearly 1/2" across and slightly longer, pure white and a striking contrast to the reddish-purple spurs and cup. There are 10 (usually) to 30 of these medium-large flowers per stem. 6-10" tall with medium-sized, dark glossy evergreen leaflets. Spreads 6-8" a year forming a dense low ground­cover. Benefits from some winter mulch in Zone 5.  Not available in 2017.

Epimedium grandiflorum 'First Kiss'

E. grandiflorum   ‘First Kiss’  (Cc. 920019)

One of the smallest grandiflorums. Large flowers are produced just above the first set of leaves at only 4” tall. Dark lavender-rose flowers have white accents on the rim of the cup and the spur tips. Small spring leaflets are flushed purple. Second flush to 9”.  Its short stature makes it great for troughs or the front of the shade border.  $10

Epimedium grandiflorum 'Mt. Kitadake Red'

E. grandiflorum   ‘Mt. Kitadake Red’  (Cc. 960020)

A darling little plant, beginning its bloom with leaves only 5” tall. The large, rose-red flowers are held above the foliage at 7” high. A second flush of leaflets follows on stems to 10”. Each small leaflet is tinted with bronze to dark reddish-purple in spring. This clone has exhibited pink and yellow fall color in the nursery.  $12 

Epimedium grandiflorum 'Nanum'

Epimedium grandiflorum   ‘Nanum’  (Cc. 950149)

Perfect for a shady trough garden or border edge at only 3-5” in bloom. Second growth flush of foliage later reaches 10” in height. Medium-sized white flowers are in proportion to the size of the plant as are the tiny, rounded spring leaflets, each with a light purple band around their edge in spring.  $12

Epimedium grandiflorum var. coelestre 'Alpine Beauty'

E. grandiflorum var. coelestre ‘Alpine Beauty’ (Cc. 950058) 

***2000 Cobblewood Introduction*** 


Extremely rare in the wild and in cultivation, this is the only Epimedium that grows at montaine heights. Beauti­ful, small oval spring leaflets often have a thin rose band around the edge. This clone was originally col­lected by Harold Epstein. The large, outward-facing flowers are a luminous light yellow suspended over a tight bun of foliage 6” tall. Blooms later than most E. grandiflorum. Very hardy, proba­bly to Zone 3, but may fail south of Zone 7. Perfect for the rock or alpine garden. Not available for overseas shipping. $15

Epimedium grandiflorum var. higoense 'Bandit'

E. grandiflorum var. higoense   ‘Bandit’  (Cc. 950057) 


Although Darrell has obtained this clone from several sources, he has traced it back to a 1981 We Du Nursery purchase from Japan. It is very different from the clone he got from them eleven years later. After many years of trialing, he named it in 2000 as it is very distinct and has the most striking, dark purple band around the edge of each small leaflet as it emerges in spring. Medium-sized, creamy-white flowers cover the plant at 6” tall, with a second flush of banded leaves to 12” as the older leaves green up. A customer favorite. $18

Epimedium grandiflorum var. higoense 'Confetti'

E. grandiflorum var. higoense ‘Confetti’ (Cc. 960144)
***2007 Cobblewood™ Introduction***

A marvel of texture. Each leaf is composed of up to 50 small leaflets, and most are uniquely speckled, flecked and splotched with dark purple in spring. Our leafiest clone of Epimedium by far. 7” high in bloom, bearing hordes of elegantly crafted, medium-sized white flowers. All flower parts are thin and tapered, the whole giving the effect of delicate spiders floating over the foliage. $15

Epimedium grandiflorum var. higoense 'Saturn'

E. grandiflorum var. higoense   ‘Saturn’  (Cc. 920023)   

A 1991 We Du introduction named by Dick Weaver for the maroon band that circles each tiny spring leaflet. Only 4 to 5” tall in bloom, the second growth flush may reach 8”. Medium-sized, creamy-white flowers.  Foliage provides a fine-textured effect in the garden. Later to bloom than most grandiflorums. $8

Epimedium leptorrhizum 'Hubei Treasure'

Epimedium leptorrhizum ‘Hubei Treasure’  (Cc. 001259) 

                   ***2005 Cobblewood  Introduction***

Traveling along the Sichuan/Hubei Province border in China on a transitional day between target locations in November of 2000, Darrell stopped to stretch his legs. There he found an Epimedium in the cracks of a short cliff along a farmer’s field. With long hairs on the leaves and long rhizomes, he identified it as E. leptorrhizum, and collected a few samples. Fortunately this clone has larger flowers with near-white spurs backed by rich pink inner sepals, a striking deviation from the typical pale lavender-pink blooms of this species. The evergreen leaves are larger than those of the species.    $18

 

Epimedium leptorrhizum Y44

Epimedium leptorrhizum Y44  (Same clone/Sev. Cc. num.)

From Guizhou Province in China, its large light lavender-pink flowers and medium-sized leaves are similar to those of E. brachyrrhizum-- elongated and arrow-shaped, with a corrugated texture. However, it spreads by thin rhizomes that grow 8”+ a year with foliage 6-8” tall.  Forms a thick, low evergreen groundcover. Reddish fall color.  Evergreen. Limited for spring, more for fall. $15

Epimedium macrosepalum 'Sweet Rachel'

Epimedium macrosepalum  ‘Sweet Rachel’

(Cc. 040102)

***2010 Cobblewood Introduction***


 A beautifully foliaged form, this clone has very shiny, bright burgundy leaves in winter if grown in some sun. The heart-shaped leaves have the texture of the finest leather. Same beautiful, large rose pink flowers as the species and a reliable bloomer. Thin rhizomes grow 4-8”a year. From a plant collecting trip Darrell sponsored in cooperation with the U.S. National Arboretum. Evergreen.   $22

Epimedium platypetalum

Epimedium platypetalum    (Several clones/Cc. numbers)

Native to China, 12 to 15” stems carry 10 to 20 dainty yellow bells suspended like tiny shuttlecocks, backed by tiny, white or reddish inner-sepals. The delicate blooms are held aloft on upright stems rising above small, rounded leaflets. Spreads by 8-12” long rhizomes, forming a low groundcover. Small, rounded, and slightly flecked new spring leaflets have few spines. While evergreen, the leaves flatten in the winter and are not very ornamental during that season. A particularly drought tolerant species.   $22 

Epimedium sempervirens "Violet"

E. sempervirens “Violet”  (Cc. 950069)

Grown for many years by Harold Epstein, Epimedium enthusiast, this may be a named Japanese cul­tivar. Medium-sized lavender flowers have spurs that curve inward back towards the cup. Flowers are held above medium-sized leaflets on stems to 14”. Unusually long, narrow leaflets sport irregular dark flecking in the spring.   Semi-evergreen.   $12

 

Epimedium sempervirens 'Aurora'

E. sempervirens  ‘Aurora’  (Cc. 920018)      


Dwarf form with large, dark silky, silvery lavender blooms and glossy foliage even as a deciduous type. Small/medium-sized leaflets. 6" tall in bloom with a second flush to 9". The new growth displays occasional dark flecking in spring. Second flush may have a pink blush as the photo shows. Often has good orange-red fall color when grown in bright shade or some sun. Named by Dick Weaver and sold by We Du as a cultivar of E. grandiflorum. Semi-evergreen. (Photo of foliage by Jan Sacks, Joe Pye Weed's Garden)  $12 

Epimedium sempervirens 'Rose Dwarf'

E. sempervirens   ‘Rose Dwarf’ (Cc. 950027)

Originally offered by George Schenk in the 1970’s and still quite rare in the trade. We thank Jerry Flintoff for our original stock. Plants 5” tall in bloom with unusually long, narrow, medium-sized leaflets, gradually tapering to a thin point and flecked with bronze in the spring. Flowers similar to those of Violet Queen’, dark violet-lavender with long inner-sepals. Semi-evergreen$15

Epimedium sempervirens 'Snowshoe Lake'

Epimedium sempervirens ‘Snowshoe Lake’


(Cc. 950033)
***2014 Cobblewood Introduction***


A white flowered very floriferous form of this extremely early bloomer. Sited in bright shade or a couple of hours of sun a day, it will produce clouds of clean white medium-sized flowers, 6” above the ground at the first thaw. Leaflets sport a delicate red line along their margins in early spring.


A cheerful and fitting tribute to my brother George who lived on Snowshoe Lake in Alaska. 8-10” at maturity. $15

Epimedium sutchuenense

Epimedium sutchuenense   (Several clones/Cc. Numbers)

From the mountains of southern Shaanxi and northwest Hubei Provinces where it blankets the slopes at approximately 6,000’ elevation. Superficially resembling E. leptorrhizum, with large, lavender-mauve flowers and long, thin 8-12" rhizomes. It produces two leaves on every flower stem, each with three medium-sized leaflets. Uniformly short at less than 6” tall. Forms an excellent, very low, evergreen ground cover. Limited spring supply, more for fall.  $15

Epimedium trifoliatobinatum

Epimedium trifoliatobinatum    (Cc. 950046)

Found in only a few areas on Shikoku, Japan, it is treated as a valid species by Prof. W. T. Stearn. However, Darrell Probst thinks that it looks very much like a stabilized, true-breeding form of E. x youngianum, as the area to which it is endemic is within a region where E. grandiflorum and E. diphyllum  naturally overlap. This clone is only 5” tall in bloom with a second growth flush to 9” tall. Leaflets are very small, less than 1” long, and flecked, shaded in dark red in spring. Medium-sized white flowers have spurs like E. grandiflorum but are smaller and in proportion to the overall diminutive habit of this clone.   $10

Epimedium x 'Lemon Zest'

Epimedium x ‘Lemon Zest’  (Cc. 990617)

***2005 Cobblewood Introduction***


 From low, dense mounds of small, shiny, rounded evergreen leaflets flushed bronze in spring, emerge many erect racemes up to 15” high of cheerful, bright lemon-yellow bells.  A hybrid created by Darrell Probst. $20

E. x 'Serendipity'

Epimedium x 'Serendipity'  (Cc. 060300)


***2017 Cobblewood Introduction***


A chance open-pollinated seedling of E. pauciflorum brought to my attention by to Elaine Chittenden of Smith College Botanic Garden, this selection is an excellent white-flowered, spreading Epimedium-- a rare find. Low and vigorous with loads of cheerful, white flowers (touched with light lavender, but they “read” as white) are scattered 8 to 10” above small, chocolate-edged and irregularly speckled leaflets-- quite unlike any E. pauciflorum I know. Similar to E. grandiflorum var. higoense in size and shape, but it spreads with 1-4” long rhizomes, mak-ing a 4-6” high, dense groundcover, perfect for small gardens or small spaces. Semi-evergreen. Now how is that for a happy chance!  $22

E. x 'Tanima No Yuki'

Epimedium × ‘Tanima No Yuki’   (Cc. 050040)

A charming Japanese cultivar with deep rosy-mauve, bell-shaped hanging flowers held above red stained and speckled medium-sized green leaves to 10”. Provides a riot of color in spring.  $18

Epimedium x youngianum 'Akebono'

E. youngianum  ‘Akebono’ (Cc. 980004)

A charming small Japanese cultivar, with ¾” delicate, but full, light rose pink/lavender flowers. Small cup is backed by long, slender, pointed sepals with a white mid-rib. New growth has a reddish-cast at leaf edge. Foliage matures to small, milky-green leaves. 5” in bloom, second flush to 8”.  Very floriferous.   Sold out for 2016.

Epimedium x youngianum 'Baby Doll Pink'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘Baby Doll Pink’  

(Cc. 950072)

***1999 Cobblewood Introduction***


Either an unlabeled Japanese cultivar or a seedling from Harold’s garden. Small, spurless flowers are dark pink in bud, opening a pale pink edged in medium pink. A truly pink-flowered Epimedium. Extended bloom above small, light green leaflets with a pink tint in spring give this plant real garden merit. Only 3” tall in first flower, it continues to produce more flowers to 9” tall.   $8

E x youngianum 'Fairy Dust'

E. youngianum  ‘Fairy Dust’ (Cc. 950241)

***2004 Cobblewood Introduction***


 

Small, simple, lavender-pink flowers with small white spurs lift their faces above the foliage in spring. The color deepens toward the edge of each flower part. Fresh spring leaves have the texture of silk and are tinted in a delicate shade of mocha. Compact growth at 7” in bloom, and flowers to 10”, creating a neat and tidy effect.  $15

Epimedium x youngianum ‘Grape Fizz’

E. youngianum   ‘Grape Fizz’ (Cc. 950242)

***2004 Cobblewood Introduction***


 


Small, rich, grape-purple buds open to release full, blue-lavender blossoms with irregular white highlights at the base of each part. Each flower has four vestigial white spurs. Flowers form a loose tumble above a low 5” mound of lime-green foliage. 7” in bloom. Long lasting bloom. New foliage has a brownish tint. The medium-sized leaves have acute basal lobes and deeply indented veins, producing a seer­sucker effect.  $15.

Epimedium x youngianum 'Hanagaruma'

E. youngianum  ‘Hanagaruma’  (Cc. 970065)

Ozzie Johnson of Marietta, GA bought this tiny floriferous selection for Darrell in a Japanese nursery. From a low mass of small leaflets only 6” tall, sprout 9” stems carrying many me­dium-sized flowers. Its grandi­florum-like flowers cluster thickly together just above the foliage, making quite a show. A pale lavender-pink cup and slender spurs are backed by lavender-pink sepals. Second flush to 10”.   $8

Epimedium x youngianum "Japanese Cultivar"

E. ×youngianum “Japanese Cultivar” (Cc. 960051)

A charming Japanese cultivar that Epimedium connoisseur Harold Epstein purchased during his last trip to Japan, but lost the label. Sprightly, medium-sized, rose pink flowers appear above small leaflets flushed purple. White overlays the main veins of each small leaflet all season long. 6” tall in bloom, eventually growing to 9”. $12

Epimedium x youngianum 'Jenny Wren'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘Jenny Wren’  (Cc. 990568)

***2003 Cobblewood Introduction***


 A dainty cultivar from the garden of John Marchacos, Berlin, CT.  The small, dark green spring leaflets are speckled and splotched with burgundy against a softer purple wash like the markings of a tiny wren’s egg. Light, lavender-pink, medium-sized flowers stand perky and bright against the mottled foliage. 5” in bloom, to 12”.  $12

Epimedium x youngianum 'Lilliputian'

E. youngianum ‘Liliputian’  (Cc. 950128)

Friend Judy Springer shared this Don Jacobs (Eco Gardens) introduc­tion with Darrell. A true miniature with tiny light green leaflets delicately peppered with maroon purple flecks. Only 2” tall in first bloom with 4” flower stems. Showy medium-sized, creamy-white flowers are profuse and similar to those of E. grandiflorum in shape. Second flush to 7” produces additional speckled leaflets.   $12

Epimedium x youngianum 'Merlin'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘Merlin’  (Cc. 960057)

A seedling of E. youngianum ‘Roseum’ that appeared in the garden of Amy Doncaster, Washfield Nursery, U.K. The distinctive flower form has an “inflated” sphere-shaped cup. Sepals and petals are white near the base, flushed with a dusky, sanded violet, with the deepest color saturation near the tips of the inner-sepals. Flowers are held above the mass of small leaflets on stems to 9”. $8

Epimedium x youngianum 'Milk Chocolate'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘Milk Chocolate’

(Cc. 990616) 

***2005 Cobblewood Introduction***


 ‘Milky Way’ sometimes produces sporadic new spring leaflets that are nearly solid purple. Darrell once found an entirely purple leaf, selected that division, and began propagating it to stabilize the characteristic. The resulting ‘Milk Chocolate’ produces small chocolate-purple leaves with tiny green flecks in spring. The color remains for weeks in contrast with the multitudes of white, medium-sized flowers. Semi-evergreen. 6” in bloom, to 12”. $22

Epimedium x youngianum 'White Cloud'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘White Cloud’  (Cc. 950232)

***2001 Cobblewood Introduction***


‘White Cloud’ blows the roof off bud count with an astounding number of flower stems per plant. With a few hours of sun each day, it literally yields clouds of small, white flowers on 6-10” stems. Each small spring leaflet sports a pale purple perimeter band. A Darrell Probst (always searching for a higher bud count) hybrid.  $15 

Epimedium x youngianum 'White Star'

Epimedium youngianum  ‘White Star’

(Cc. 950011)

***2000 Cobblewood Introduction***


A spontaneous seedling found in the Asian Collections at the U.S. National Arboretum. This floriferous clone bears small, white flowers with spurs equal in length to the inner-sepals. The small thick leaflets remain evergreen in USDA Zone 7 and farther south, semi-evergreen elsewhere. Delightful at 5" tall in bloom, eventually growing to 8". $10

Astilbe 'Cobblewood Cotton Candy'

Astilbe x ‘Cobblewood Cotton Candy’
***2008 Cobblewood™ Introduction***

Like a fuzzy plume of cotton candy from a county fair-- full, delicious medium salmon-pink flower heads rise to 10” tall, above a rosette of bold dark green foliage, 9” across. Mid-season bloom. $18

Astilbe 'Cobblewood Fireworks'

Astilbe ‘Cobblewood Fireworks’

***2008 Cobblewood Dwarf Astilbe Introduction***


Rich, ruby pink flower sprays form with open panicles, like exploding fireworks. Flower spikes rise 8-10” above deep green, lacy-edged leaves of good substance, that form a mass 5” tall × 9” wide. Earliest of the three dwarf varieties to bloom.  Not available in 2017.

Astilbe x 'Cobblewood Shooting Stars'

Astilbe x ‘Cobblewood Shooting Stars’
***2008 Cobblewood™ Introduction***

These truly unique miniature Astilbes emerge, with soft, reddish, moss-like foliage. In mid July,  it  produces a perfectly proportioned white flower plume, held above stiff, lustrous, jagged-edged rosette of dark green leaves. The large sprays of white flowers are open and airy to 10”. Leaves to 5". The latest of the three Cobblewood dwarfs to bloom. Not available 2017. 

Iris cristata 'Doubly Stylish'

Iris cristata ‘Doubly Stylish’
***2010 Joe Pye Weed’s Garden Introduction***
Originated by good friends and avid Iris growers Barbara and David Schmeider of Concord, MA, this new “double flowered” cristata has six light blue-violet falls and six to nine pearly blue styles, and no stand-ards! A lovely double flower in traditional cristata colors with clean white signals, dark blue halos and yellow-orange crests tipped in white. A vigorous plant and heavy bloomer. (Photo courtesy of Jan Sacks) Not available in 2017.

Primula kisoana forma alba

Primula kisoana f. alba 


 The white-flowered form of this spreading Japanese woodland primrose. Downy, scalloped light green foliage is very different from other Primulas. Great as a low ground cover planted at the base taller woodland plants.  Clusters of white flowers in mid-May. Prefers evenly moist, humus-rich soils.  4-6” high. Forms extensive, thick colonies over time.  Sold out for 2017.

Trillium pusillum 'Roadrunner'

Trillium pusillum  ‘Roadrunner’

***2007 Joe Pye Weed's Garden Introduction***


Trilliums are notoriously slow to propagate. While this diminuitive species propagates faster than most, this clone grows particularly rapidly, making a substantial, floriferous clump in just a few years. New spring leaves emerge dark purple, almost black, and remain so as the 1-1/2” white, tri-petaled flowers open. Each petal has a rosy reverse. Foliage matures to green as the flowers blush to pink as they age.  Never fails to draw attention during our open nursery weekends. $15

Vancouveria hexandra

Vancouveria hexandra    (Several Cc.)

A west coast native, and also a later-blooming relative to Epimedium. This fine-textured, low-growing groundcover sports leaflets reminiscent of “duck’s feet” to 6” high, with flower stems to 15”. Blooms about a month later than do Epimediums, producing numerous small, pendulous white flowers, similar to those of Epimedium, but with six flower parts instead of four. Very drought tolerant and an excellent ground cover for deep shade. Spreads vigorously by underground rhizomes.  $12

Previous