Cold-tolerant

 

These epimediums are especially tolerant of cold weather.

Epimedium brevicornu

Epimedium brevicornu    (Several clones/Cc. numbers)  

A beautiful hardy, deciduous species native to the northern regions in China where Epimediums are not normally found. These are divisions from plants collected during Darrell’s 2001 expedition to Henan Province where no Epimediums had been previously recorded. Produces an 8 to 10” high mass of small, rather round, heart-shaped leaflets. Numerous 10” long spikes carry “clouds” of small, star-shaped white flowers, each with short, reflexed spurs with a hint of yellow in the center. New leaflets may be speckled with reddish-purple and are thin and reminiscent of parchment paper to the touch. Hardy to Zone 4 and perhaps even 3.   $15

Epimedium fargesii

Epimedium  fargesii  (Several clones/Cc. numbers)

The typical form of a very choice species and the main target of Darrell’s November 2000 collecting trip to China. He gathered small divisions from a variety of plants at seven locations. 12-18” tall in bloom, with narrow, medium-sized arrow-shaped, dark evergreen leaflets. Medium-sized flowers typically have long, white/pale lavender inner-sepals that wrap around smaller, lavender spurs. Often both reflex backwards.  Foliage exhibits dark maroon flecking in spring and sometimes fall. $22

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens #2

E. grandiflorum f.  flavescens #2   (Cc. 940550)


Of over 50 distinct clones of E. grandiflorum f. flavescens we grow, this is by far the earliest to bloom with large, pale greenish-yellow flowers held below large, elliptical, bright apple green leaflets. Large, mature leaflets etched by the nearly parallel main veins make a bold, elegant garden statement. From the Kyoto Botanic Garden in Japan, it is very different from other clones circulating in the U.S. 20" tall. $8

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens #3

Epimedium grandiflorum  f.  flavescens #3   (Cc. 950129) 

Originally sold by Siskiyou Rare Plant Nursery under the invalid name E. macranthum‘Aureum’. At 14”, it is shorter than most other E. grandiflorum f. flavescens clones offered here.  Beautiful red-copper young leaflets unfurl over large, pale yellow flowers. After bloom, large, bold, oval-shaped leaflets expand to form an impressive mound. Clear yellow fall foliage color.   $8

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens #5

E. grandiflorum  f. flavescens #5  (Cc. 970232)  

Reminiscent of E. koreanum ‘Harold Epstein’, with large soft yellow flowers and huge rounded leaflets, nearly as broad as long. However, the rhizomes only grow 2-4” per year, forming a much thicker mass in the gar­den. Large, light yellow flowers. 20” tall.  Rusty red fall color.   $8

Epimedium grandiflorum f . flavescens #6

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens #6 

Cc. 950188
Distinctive for the exaggerated extra points on each terminal leaflet. In spring, the large leaflets have a thin dark bronze edging with an overall light bronze blush. The smooth leaf surface and very delicate spring coloration creates a soft effect. Pale yellow flowers are borne beneath the leaves. 16” in bloom, to 20” tall. Fall ship only$12

Epimedium grandiflorum forma flavescens "Aomori Forms"

E. g. f. flavescens “Aomori Forms” (Sev cl/Cc. #) 

Prof. Stearn’s 1938 Epimedium monograph mentions “Faurie’s robust specimens from Aomori in Honshu, Japan”. Darrell explored the region in 1997. After several inquiries, their host led them to a steep hillside of densely planted Cryptomeria japonica, beneath which grew knee-high Epimediums with leaflets the size of your hand! Spring leaflets often flushed bronze-purple on 15-24” stems. Large, light yel­low flowers open beneath the unfurling leaves. Rhizomes spread 2-4” a year, creating massive clumps over time.   Not available in 2017.

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens 'Chocolate Lace'

E. grandiflorum f. flavescens  ‘Chocolate Lace’  
(Cc. 980200) 

***2003 Cobblewood Introduction***


Yummy, milk-chocolate tones on the emerging spring leaflets later melt into a rich burgundy tracing over a green backdrop with deep purple edges, before they mature to green. Large creamy, yellow-green flowers are held below the foli­age. 10” tall in bloom, with no second flush of growth. Spreads 4-6" per year. Particularly beautiful in combination with large, blue or yellow-leaved hostas. $18

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens 'LaRocaille'

Epimedium grandiflorum f. flavescens  ‘La Rocaille’  (Cc. 950040)  

Originally offered in the 1970’s as E. grandiflorum f. flavescens by George Schenk of The Wild Garden, Bothel, WA.  Plants established in Harold’s garden 25 years before grew into a large mass 6’ across. Its vigorous habit, long arrow-shaped leaflets and large, pale yellow flowers moved Harold to name it after his garden. Foliage is flushed a beautiful red in spring. 14” tall.   $12

Epimedium grandiflorum var. coelestre 'Alpine Beauty'

E. grandiflorum var. coelestre ‘Alpine Beauty’ (Cc. 950058) 

***2000 Cobblewood Introduction*** 


Extremely rare in the wild and in cultivation, this is the only Epimedium that grows at montaine heights. Beauti­ful, small oval spring leaflets often have a thin rose band around the edge. This clone was originally col­lected by Harold Epstein. The large, outward-facing flowers are a luminous light yellow suspended over a tight bun of foliage 6” tall. Blooms later than most E. grandiflorum. Very hardy, proba­bly to Zone 3, but may fail south of Zone 7. Perfect for the rock or alpine garden. Not available for overseas shipping. $15

Epimedium ilicifolium

Epimedium ilicifolium (Several clones/Cc. numbers)

A particularly cold-hardy, Chinese evergreen species from Shaanxi Province. Darrell found it in three areas in Nov. 2000 at the highest elevation above snowline. He trudged up steep ravines through snow and freezing temps just to see it in the wild. The long, narrow, evergreen leaflets are especially spiny (ilici-=holly, folium=leaf), on stems to 10”. Large flowers with light green inner sepals and bright yellow spurs, on stems to 18”. Not available in 2017.

Epimedium koreanum

E. koreanum    (Cc. 970079)

Professor Stearn recognized this plant as a distinct species in his 2002 monograph. The staff at the Chollipo Arboretum in S. Korea generously shared a few clones. The species is reportedly quite com­mon in N. Korea and we have additional clones from multiple sites in N.E. China which is the northernmost range of the species. Quite hardy, probably to USDA Zone 3, this deciduous species is usually the first to drop its leaves, shortly after the first killing frost. Each leaf is composed of 9-15 huge, rounded lime green leaflets circumscribed with a thin red line in spring.  Three to seven huge, light yellow flowers are pro­duced on each stem beneath unfurling leaves in spring. Once established, it spreads vigorously by 6-12” rhi­zomes to form a large colony. An excellent bold-foliaged plant at 15-18” tall. Emerges and blooms later than most Epimediums. Not available in 2017.

 

Epimedium koreanum 'Harold Epstein'

Epimedium koreanum  ‘Harold Epstein’  (Cc. 930004)

A very cold hardy clone with huge flowers for an Epimedium— gor­geous and butter yellow. Named in honor of Harold Epstein by famed plantsman Jerry Flintoff, its enormous leaflets can reach over 6” long and 4-1/2" wide. Spreads 6-8" a year. It usually takes 2-3 years to establish itself and be­come most impressive. The flowers emerge before the leaflets unfurl in early spring. E. koreanum is notorious for just putting up one set of leaves per node each season. If the leaf suffers  damage, the rhizome will remain dormant until the following year. ‘Harold’ is a great bold-textured vigorous ground cover for large areas where it can spread unimpeded. It is especially useful in combination with early spring bulbs for sequential bloom. After bloom the expanding leaves serve as camouflage for the dying bulb foliage. 15" tall. $18 

Epimedium lishihchenii

Epimedium lishihchenii  (Several clones/Cc. numbers) 

Collected by NACPEC in 1994 in Hubei Province, China, along with E. stellulatum. Produces large, bold evergreen leaflets that are heavy in substance. The large flowers have green inner-sepals and bright yellow spurs. Hardy to at least Zone 4. Grows to 12” tall. May exhibit various pastel shades in its spring foliage color.   Fall ship only$22

 

Epimedium macrosepalum

E. macrosepalum  (Several clones/Cc. numbers)


A species from the S.E. coastal region of Russia. The flower of this species has enormous inner sepals that are a heavenly shade of lavender-pink. Unlike most inner sepals that follow the curve of the spurs, these petaloid structures reflex back like huge rounded wings, arching above the down curving spurs, like an insect taking flight. Both the cup and the tips of the spurs fade to white. Low growing, ground hugging foliage 4-8” high is composed of small to medium-sized rounded, heart-shaped leaflets that turn deep maroon over winter. Papery smooth and evergreen. Its low, running habit makes this species a good groundcover. Rhizomes grow 6-8+”a year.   $18

Epimedium macrosepalum 'Sweet Rachel'

Epimedium macrosepalum  ‘Sweet Rachel’

(Cc. 040102)

***2010 Cobblewood Introduction***


 A beautifully foliaged form, this clone has very shiny, bright burgundy leaves in winter if grown in some sun. The heart-shaped leaves have the texture of the finest leather. Same beautiful, large rose pink flowers as the species and a reliable bloomer. Thin rhizomes grow 4-8”a year. From a plant collecting trip Darrell sponsored in cooperation with the U.S. National Arboretum. Evergreen.   $22

Epimedium stellulatum "Narrow Leaf Forms"

Epimedium stellulatum  “Narrow Leaf Forms” (Sev. clones/Cc. #)  

NACPEC (North American China Plant Exploration Consortium, is a group of ten botanic gardens and arboreta from across the U.S. and Canada, organized by the National Arboretum to explore areas of China on an annual or semi-annual basis. NACPEC has made several exciting discoveries, including this group of Epimedium stellulatum.

Discovered in several areas in the Qin Ling Shan of Shaanxi Province in 1996, the evergreen leaflets are medium in size, narrower than the original form and have especially spiny margins. 12-18”. The flowers are small white “stars” with tiny yellow petals on long, erect stems held well above the leaves. The floral display is like a miniature constellation suspended above spiny evergreen foliage. Early flowering and long-blooming, 12-18” tall. Hardy to Zone 4, possibly 3. Not available in 2017.

Epimedium stellulatum 'Wudang Star'

Epimedium stellulatum   ‘Wudang Star’ L1193  (Cc. 960139)

Collected in the Wudang-Shan by Roy Lancaster, this clone was the original collection used to describe the species. Plants produce nu­merous sprays of small, starry-white flowers with minute yellow spurs over spiny, evergreen foliage. The faded maroon-flecked spring leaflets of this clone are much wider and rounded than those of the straight species. 12-18”.  Limited for spring, more for fall. $22 

Epimedium sutchuenense

Epimedium sutchuenense   (Several clones/Cc. Numbers)

From the mountains of southern Shaanxi and northwest Hubei Provinces where it blankets the slopes at approximately 6,000’ elevation. Superficially resembling E. leptorrhizum, with large, lavender-mauve flowers and long, thin 8-12" rhizomes. It produces two leaves on every flower stem, each with three medium-sized leaflets. Uniformly short at less than 6” tall. Forms an excellent, very low, evergreen ground cover. Limited spring supply, more for fall.  $15

Iris tectorum 'Slippery Slope'

Iris tectorum ‘Slippery Slope’  

***2010 Cobblewood Introduction***


Darrell has failed endless times growing the Japanese roof iris in our climate. The flower buds die over winter, starting a rot that eventually kills the plant. He collected this much hardier clone at a high elevation in the Dabashan region of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Here they were pulled up and over the icy mountain by a coal truck in Nov. 2000, hence the cultivar name.

As you can see, this clone thrives in half sun on an exposed stony ridge in my garden.  Best with sharp drainage in light shade/part sun. Large 4” violet blossoms emerge in late spring from 2’ × 2’ bright green foliage fans, giving a tropical appearance to an otherwise New England perennial garden. Spreads slowly by fleshy rhizomes to form a massive clump over time, so give it some elbow room!  $15

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